Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

Source:  Tuberous Sclerosis Complex    Tag:  what is tuberous sclerosis
WHAT IS TSC?

Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a genetic disorder that causes tumors to form in many different organs, primarily in the brain, eyes, heart, kidney, skin and lungs. You will see it referred to both as tuberous sclerosis (TS) and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The term TSC is used in scientific literature to distinguish tuberous sclerosis complex from Tourette's syndrome.

The disease affects some people severely, while others are so mildly affected that it often goes undiagnosed. Some people with TSC experience developmental delay, mental retardation and autism. However, there are also many people with TSC living independent, healthy lives who enjoy challenging professions such as doctors, lawyers, educators and researchers.

How many people have TSC?

At least two children born each day will have tuberous sclerosis complex. Current estimates place tuberous sclerosis complex-affected births at one in 6,000. Nearly 1 million people worldwide are known to have TSC, with approximately 50,000 in the United States. There are many undiagnosed cases due to the obscurity of the disease and the mild form symptoms may take in some people. TSC is as common as ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease) but virtually unknown by the general population.

How does a person develop TSC?

Tuberous sclerosis complex is transmitted either through genetic inheritance or as a spontaneous genetic mutation. Children have a 50 percent chance of inheriting TSC if one of their parents has this condition. At this point, only one-third of TSC cases are known to be inherited. The other two-thirds are believed to be a result of spontaneous mutation. The cause of these mutations is still a mystery